News & Announcements

Annual Report 2020-2021

Redefining Resilience

The past year has been difficult for people everywhere; however, throughout Los Angeles County, it’s been especially tough on the children, youth, and families we serve. The pandemic made reaching those who need us challenging yet vitally important. At the same time, we mobilized with people worldwide against racism and other forms of systemic oppression.

These realities compelled our Village to re-examine our own culture and practices. As a result, we have redoubled our efforts to strengthen our long-standing commitment to being a diverse, equitable and inclusive organization.

The previous year’s challenges also provided an opportunity for us to continue to learn, grow, adapt, and practice resilience.

In this impact report, we share stories of strength, partnership, and community-building. We proudly introduce Alisse, a young mother of three who came to our Drop-In Center for homeless youth and “rebooted” her life with help from The Village. You’ll also meet Arturo Ramos and Hector Flores, loving parents who worked with us to foster and adopt two little girls. And you’ll learn from Armen Youssefians, LMFT, our Senior Director of Mental Health Outpatient Services, about how our clients embraced telehealth during the pandemic.

We are optimistic about the year ahead and are fully committed to serving even more children and youth who are in urgent need of the services we provide. We thank you for the vital role you play as a member of our family here at The Village. We couldn’t do what we do without you.

Welcome to our 2020-2021 impact report.

Hugo C. Villa, LMFT
Chief Executive Officer

Irma Seilicovich, LMFT
Chief Operating Officer

The Village Family Services welcomes three new board members

The Village Family Services Board of Directors is pleased to announce the addition of three new members beginning March 2022.

Scott Mills serves as General Manager of The Garland. A second-generation hotelier with more than 30 years of hospitality experience, Mills oversees all aspects of the iconic North Hollywood hotel. Since joining the team in January 2013, Mills has led the rebrand and major $28 million renovation of The Garland, which has resulted in an award-winning hotel recognized among the top 15 hotels in Los Angeles in Condé Nast Traveler’s 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 and 2020 Readers’ Choice Awards.

“I am honored to be involved with such an impactful organization that can make such a positive impact on so much of our local community in need. As a new board member with The Village Family Services I look forward to helping bring  more awareness and support to some of LA’s most vulnerable youth and families.”- Scott Mills

Robert Lee Walters is owner of Leland Properties in Studio City, a boutique real estate firm specializing in client care and private celebrity clients. Walters’ has been named one of the Top 10 Brokers in the Studio City/Hollywood Hills area for the past 21 years. He has built a solid record of achievement and advancement through increasingly responsible real estate sales and customer rapport.

“I’m excited to be a part of The Village Family Services and work with them in serving the community as they transform families and individuals with support and useful resources. I love what they are doing and honored to be a part of it and I look forward to making a difference in the community.  I will strive to do my part in spreading the word and helping procure charitable contributions from businesses and individuals inside and outside my sphere.” – Robert Lee Walters

Matthew P. Inouye currently serves as a field liaison between the office of Representative Gomez and California’s 34th congressional district. Matthew is the Transitional-Aged Youth Representative on the board and has had lived experience as a former homeless youth. Matthew is a former client of The Village’s Drop-In Center and an advocate for the LGBTQ+ community.

“I look forward to voting on policies, creating plans of action, and collaborating with partners to positively affect the lives of our clients and community at large. The Village is a place where transformative change happens, and I plan on being part of it. As someone who started off as an employment specialist with the Drop-In Center, I hope to use my experiences to provide necessary input on how to improve the organization.”- Matthew P. Inouye

Annual Report 2019-2020

A Year Like No Other

The past year has challenged us to come together like never before to fulfill our role as an essential service provider. The rapid transformation that our dedicated staff made at the onset of COVID-19 enabled us to deliver uninterrupted services to children, youth and families who, during “normal” times, already faced significant adversity.

The impact of the pandemic, including record unemployment rates, economic hardship, school closures, and downturns in emotional health and well-being, could have paralyzed us in fear and chaos. Yet, together, we stood in strength and determination.

We made thoughtful yet fast-paced changes that touched every aspect of our agency-programs and services, our Drop-in Center for homeless youth, communications, operations, and even our board governance. We overhauled protocols and processes to ensure quality and safety, expanded our telehealth and technology capacity, and increased our proactive communication with our staff, clients and partners to ensure that we all stayed connected and coordinated.

We are honored to share our 2019/2020 Annual Report with you.

 Hugo C. Villa, LMFT
Chief Executive Officer  

Irma Seilicovich, LMFT
Chief Operating Officer

Hector’s Story

Hector’s Story

A Bright Future for Hector and His Family

When Hector was injured and lost his job, he and his family also lost their home. Hector sent his wife, son and four-year-old daughter Kimberly to live with relatives in Mexico. It took him three years to get back on his feet and send for his family.

Kimberly was seven when she returned to the U.S., a country and language that felt new, frightening and overwhelming. She became depressed, isolated, and her schoolwork suffered. At home, the tension of her parents’ frequent fighting had a crushing impact on Kimberly and her brother.

That’s when the panic attacks began – each more terrifying than the last. Hector watched helplessly as his daughter’s small frame trembled uncontrollably. He saw how Kimberly fought for breath, hyperventilating so severely that she often vomited. The attacks worsened, and Kimberly began to self-injure.

A frantic call for help led Hector to The Village Family Services and therapist Guadalupe Cervantes. Affectionately known as Lupe, she became the family’s stalwart supporter.

The Village provided critically needed intervention for the entire family. Lupe worked with Kimberly, employing behavioral interventions and an evidence-based practice model to treat her anxiety. Lupe also visited the family in their home, teaching family members conflict-resolution skills and ways to communicate more effectively. Under Lupe’s guidance, Kimberly regained her sense of well-being, and her panic attacks subsided.

Today, Kimberly is a well-adjusted, articulate fourth grader who loves to draw. She still has an occasional panic attack, but they are less severe. She and her family now have proven techniques that help them cope with everyday stressors.

thevillage-story-hector-2

I have tremendous appreciation for The Village for helping my family. My daughter is better. And I’m a better husband because of our therapy. They have given us a lot.

– Hector

Rosie’s Story

Rosie’s Story

“A Place I Can Call My Own.”

From a very young age, Rosie was the victim of family instability and homelessness, and much of her childhood was spent in foster care. When she turned 18, she encountered challenges that are faced by many young adults exiting the foster-care system: a lack of social support, stable housing, and accessibility to supportive services.

A kinesiology student at California State University, Northridge, Rosie was balancing school, work and the daily search for her next warm meal, hot shower and safe place to sleep. Then she found The Village Family Services and was connected to a case manager, Allan Gonzalez. Allan worked with Rosie to identify her goals and potential barriers to reaching those goals. Together, they created a stability plan designed to contribute to Rosie’s overall well-being. That included finding a home.

With Allan’s help, Rosie visited apartment after apartment. But without adequate income, she was unable to secure a place to live. The Village offered employment guidance, helping her update her résumé and provided job leads with flexible schedules, so she could continue her college studies.

Rosie began working two part-time jobs and increased her income. After a year and a half of searching, Rosie moved into her own apartment in Panorama City, where she lives today. She loves having a safe place to socialize with family and friends, and where she can study without the constant worry of where her next meal, shower or shelter was going to come from. She excels at her kinesiology studies, and says she owes her success and stability to the support she received, and continues to receive, from The Village.

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“As a young adult with experience in the foster-care system, I can tell you that it hurts feeling like you’re alone in this struggle,” Rosie says. “Because of The Village Family Services, my grades drastically improved, and I finally have a home. I’m so grateful and so much happier than I was just a couple of years ago, because I have a place I can call my own. My belongings are there and protected. I have a bed that is mine, a kitchen that is mine – and most importantly, a home that is mine.”

– Rosie

Gayle’s Story

Gayle’s Story

“The Village Put Their Faith in Me.”

Gayle Alvarez’s childhood was marked by instability. Her parents separated when she was little, and she bounced back and forth, living first with one parent, then the other. When her mother became ill and required full-time assistance, Gayle dropped out of high school to care for her.

When her mother’s health deteriorated further, Gayle had to move again. A series of unsatisfactory living situations followed. By the time she turned 18, she was living out of her car. Then her car was towed, and she didn’t have the resources to retrieve it.

Despite overwhelming odds, Gayle was determined to continue her education. By this time, she had graduated from a charter high school and was studying to be a medical assistant.

“Since coming to The Village, I had dreamed of working there,” Gayle says. “So I got my résumé together and literally begged for a job.”

It happened that The Village was in the process of creating an employment referral program. Gayle became one of its first employment specialists, attending job fairs and recruiting community partners for The Village’s Drop-In Center.

Now 23, Gayle credits The Village for their support, and her own determination to make a better life for herself.

thevillage-story-gayle

Nothing in life is free. You have to want to make it. But The Village put their faith in me. And that has made a life-changing difference.

– Gayle

Gayle working with a client of The Village. Gayle working with a client of The Village.

The Village’s COVID-19 Protocols

Hours of Operation

  • Main office located in North Hollywood will run from 8:30 AM – 7:00 PM, Monday through Friday and closed on Saturday & Sunday. In advance of coming to the main offices located in North Hollywood, please call (818) 755-8786 for important information regarding your visit.
  • The Drop-In Center in North Hollywood will continue with our regularly scheduled hours.
  • The Family Wellness Center in Huntington Park will be closed to the public.

Currently, visits to our facilities are limited to the public and any individuals receiving services from The Village will be expected to comply with the following protocols in order to receive services:

  • All staff and clients must wear a face covering while in public or high-risk settings.
  • Frequent and thorough hand washing (every 30 minutes with soap for at least 20 seconds)
  • Social distancing of at least 6 feet at all times and in all situations
  • Refraining from touching one’s mouth or face
  • Refraining from shaking hands

We ask that you follow and support our safety protocols to keep you and our neighbors safe. Please You can find further safety protocols for each of our locations:

North Hollywood

North Hollywood- Drop-In-Center

Huntington Park

The following protocols must be followed by all the staff at The Village Family Services:

  • Wear a face covering in shared spaces including, hallways, breakrooms, stairwells, and shared work spaces
  • Frequent and thorough hand washing (every 30 minutes with soap for at least 20 seconds)
  • Social distancing of at least 6 feet at all times and in all situations
  • Covering one’s mouth upon coughing or sneezing
  • Refrain from touching one’s mouth or face
  • Refrain from shaking hands
  • Report to HR if you are sick or experiencing virus-associated symptoms (cough, sneezing, sore throat, fever, shortness of breath, among others)
  • Report to HR if you believe or know that you may have come in contact with someone with virus-related symptoms or an actual diagnosis
  • Report to HR if you have been off from work due to illness (your own or a family member or someone that you live with) and are planning to resume work
  • Refrain from coming to work and/or staying at work if you are ill or are experiencing any symptoms related to the coronavirus

In addition to the protocols stated above, The Village’s Coronavirus Taskforce – including leadership & key staff – meets twice a week to discuss The Village’s response to the COVID-19 crisis and to monitor the safety protocols of our staff and clients.  Below are steps the organization is taking to ensure the safety of staff & clients:

  • Sanitizing thrice daily work surfaces (i.e., counter tops, conference tables, doorknobs/handles, elevator buttons, security keypads, computers, keyboards, telephones, and office equipment)
  • Staff also sanitizes frequently touched objects upon each use
  • Providing necessary PPE for all employees to be able to complete their job duties
  • Instituting a Daily Coronavirus Employee Symptom Screening Checklist Sign-In form.

Charla Virtual: Salud Mental Durante el Aprendizaje en Casa

¡Estamos EN VIVO!

Charla Virtual: Salud Mental Durante el Aprendizaje en Casa

Únete a la charla virtual con nuestra presentadora de @AccesoTotalShow, @ArmidaOficial y expertos de Adventist Health White Memorial @AdventistHealth y Village Family Services @TheVillageFS quienes compartirán consejos e información para mantener la salud mental durante el aprendizaje desde casa.

Envía tus preguntas usando la sección de comentarios.

https://www.telemundo52.com/comunidad… #ApoyandoANuestraComunidad #Telemundo52 #T52SiempreContigo #ElPoderEnTi

The Village Family Services Chosen As A 2020 Nonprofit of the Year

CA-Nonprofit-of-the-Year-2020-seal-for-honorees-transparent

Nonprofit Honored by Assemblymember Luz Rivas of the 39th District

North Hollywood, CA – The Village Family Services is proud to announce it has been selected as a 2020 California Nonprofit of the Year by Assemblymember Luz Rivas of the 39th District.

The Village Family Services is one of over a hundred other nonprofits that will be honored by their state senators and assemblymembers for their tremendous contributions to the communities they serve.

“We are incredibly grateful to Assemblymember Rivas for nominating us,” said Hugo Villa, Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer of The Village. “She is truly a champion and advocate for the children, families and homeless youth we serve.”

The Village Family Services is leader in providing a full spectrum of trauma-informed, culturally sensitive services to children, youth and families so that they can lead safe, healthy and productive lives. Now in its 20th year, The Village is widely recognized for delivering vital support to homeless youth and those who identify as LGBTQ, and for its commitment to ending youth homelessness.

Each year, California Assembly members and State Senators are invited by the California Association of Nonprofits (CalNonprofits) to recognize an outstanding nonprofit in their District that is making a difference in their local community.

“Receiving this recognition is truly an honor,” added Irma Seilicovich, The Village’s Co-Founder and Chief Operating Officer. “Young people come to us looking for a way to move forward. We are proud to be part of the San Fernando Valley community that is working together to make a meaningful difference in their lives.”

“The pandemic and shelter-in-place orders of the last few months have put nonprofits  – usually hidden in plain sight – in the spotlight,” explains Jan Masaoka, CEO of the California Association of Nonprofits (CalNonprofits). “California Nonprofit of the Year is an opportunity for our elected officials to celebrate the good work they see nonprofits doing in their districts, and for everyone to appreciate the collective impact of nonprofits in our communities.”

Additional Background

For the last five years, legislators from across California have chosen a Nonprofit of the Year in their district. Traditionally, Chair of the Assembly Select Committee on the Nonprofit Sector Assemblywoman Monique Limón (Santa Barbara) and CalNonprofits invited legislators and honorees to a celebratory luncheon on California Nonprofits Day. This year, the June luncheon was canceled in response to the Shelter-in-Place orders, but legislators have moved forward with honoring nonprofits doing great work in their districts.

According to “Causes Count,” a 2019 report commissioned by CalNonprofits, the nonprofit sector is the 4th largest industry in the state, employing more than 1.2 million people. Each year, California nonprofits generate more than $273 billion in revenue and bring in $40 billion in revenue from outside of California. The unpaid labor contributed by volunteers at nonprofits is equivalent to 330,000 full-time jobs every year.